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I'm Sophie, and I'm a DIY artist/photographer based in Norwich, England. This blog is a collection of thoughts, opinions, facts, and stupid pictures. My webstore can be found here and my Twitter is @sophieephotos. Ask me stuff HERE
Posted on 25th Jul at 7:42 AM

TGIF and also I got paid a shitload more than I was expecting.

Posted on 24th Jul at 11:11 PM

tHERE WAS A FUCKING WASP IN MY BEDROOM

and now it’s disappeared

and I’m expected to be able to go to sleep hahahahaa

Posted on 24th Jul at 10:32 PM

work tomorrow and then it’s finally the weekend! from what I’ve been told, there’s gonna be a shitload of outgoing post tomorrow (by shitloads I mean literally hundreds upon hundreds of letters) so I’m probably going to have to stay late but I don’t care because after that it’s the weekenddddd and I don’t have work for 2 days.

Posted on 24th Jul at 9:57 PM, with 4 notes

I get paid tonight/tomorrow and I am bricking it I don’t know if I’m being paid for 2 weeks and 2 days or 1 week and 2 days, I don’t know what my hourly rate is I just know my salary so I can’t work out how much I’ll get, I don’t know if I’m going to be taxed. Stressing ouuuut I need at least £450 to last the month. argh. pray 4 me.

Posted on 24th Jul at 9:53 PM, with 604,519 notes
Message me 1 thing you want to know about me.
Posted on 24th Jul at 9:51 PM, with 2 notes

swear to god if all this yelling in my area doesn’t stop I’m going to call the council and complain. like they are running a fucking crack den out of their house, there are people yelling at each other all the time and it’s getting more frequent. I went to a doctors appointment at 7 in the evening and some rank crackhead guy looked me up and down and went “a’ight boss” like fuck off! you are making living in this flat a horrible experience! I can’t leave my flat at night!

Posted on 24th Jul at 9:41 PM, with 128,686 notes

unlucky-artist:

Maybe the best sarcastic conversation in tv history 

Posted on 24th Jul at 9:39 PM, with 75,216 notes

caelas:

saying feminism is unnecessary because you don’t feel oppressed is like saying fire extinguishers are unnecessary because your house isn’t on fire

Posted on 24th Jul at 9:11 PM, with 358 notes
amyleona:

nezua:

zuky:

zuky:

(via so-treu)(via zenlavie)
This is Anna May Wong, whom I wrote about on my old blog. Unfortunately the video clip is gone because, ahem, my YouTube account was deleted for repeated terms of use violations (hey I said I was a renegade), but here’s the text:

Anna May Wong catapulted to international fame in 1924, at the age of 19, when she appeared in the Hollywood megaproduction The Thief of Baghdad in a scandalously skimpy exotic costume with Douglas Fairbanks menacingly poking a sword at her bare back. She called herself “the woman of a thousand deaths” because her onscreen characters — prostitutes, dragon ladies, jilted lovers — inevitably died. These were the kinds of concessions to racism, misogyny, and colonialism which Wong had to make in order to flourish in Hollywood; so she made them, and she certainly flourished.
Her story is (fairly) well-known, but Bill Moyers does as good a job retelling it as I’ve seen, in this fifth part of our series. Wong occupied an in-between cultural-historical space whose internal tensions could not possibly be reconciled. Whites were happy to view Wong as a mesmerizing symbol of the Orient (Eric Maschwitz wrote the pop standard "These Foolish Things" about her), while Chinese folks were often torn about what she represented: some lauded her groundbreaking success, others decried the racist depictions she appeared to serve. She never married; her chances at finding a (Chinese American) match in her high-flying showbiz world were nil; she had flings with (white) producers and leading men, but obviously none could last. Wong’s life is often viewed through the lens of tragedy; yet perhaps this is yet another slight against a woman who forcefully, fearlessly pushed her way into the top tier of American glamour and used not only her body but her mind and her voice to shine an unprecedented light on the Chinese American experience.

amyleona:

nezua:

zuky:

zuky:

(via so-treu)(via zenlavie)

This is Anna May Wong, whom I wrote about on my old blog. Unfortunately the video clip is gone because, ahem, my YouTube account was deleted for repeated terms of use violations (hey I said I was a renegade), but here’s the text:

Anna May Wong catapulted to international fame in 1924, at the age of 19, when she appeared in the Hollywood megaproduction The Thief of Baghdad in a scandalously skimpy exotic costume with Douglas Fairbanks menacingly poking a sword at her bare back. She called herself “the woman of a thousand deaths” because her onscreen characters — prostitutes, dragon ladies, jilted lovers — inevitably died. These were the kinds of concessions to racism, misogyny, and colonialism which Wong had to make in order to flourish in Hollywood; so she made them, and she certainly flourished.

Her story is (fairly) well-known, but Bill Moyers does as good a job retelling it as I’ve seen, in this fifth part of our series. Wong occupied an in-between cultural-historical space whose internal tensions could not possibly be reconciled. Whites were happy to view Wong as a mesmerizing symbol of the Orient (Eric Maschwitz wrote the pop standard "These Foolish Things" about her), while Chinese folks were often torn about what she represented: some lauded her groundbreaking success, others decried the racist depictions she appeared to serve. She never married; her chances at finding a (Chinese American) match in her high-flying showbiz world were nil; she had flings with (white) producers and leading men, but obviously none could last. Wong’s life is often viewed through the lens of tragedy; yet perhaps this is yet another slight against a woman who forcefully, fearlessly pushed her way into the top tier of American glamour and used not only her body but her mind and her voice to shine an unprecedented light on the Chinese American experience.

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